Animal Manufacturing Co.

Ask me anything   Animal Manufacturing Co.

twitter.com/animalmfgco:

    hexabeast:

    alleecat2:

    the-bucky-barnes:

    My cat loves when we play CAH because she squeezes into the box and becomes some kind of monorail…

    Cats Against Humanity

    THe biggest, blackest cat

    (via dancearmstrong)

    — 1 day ago with 18431 notes
    fastcompany:

I have a lot of ideas in my head. And for the most part, that’s where they used to stay.
In my head. Where other people couldn’t see them, interact with them or build upon them. Where they were safe and untested and uncriticized. All mine.
Sure, I’ve created some. Some might say I’ve created plenty. But that’s only because they can’t see what I’m not creating. For example, this very post sat dormant for at least a month while I pondered, waited and nitpicked at it.
Because the riskiest, most dangerous and potentially most interesting ideas are the easiest to hold back. I would pin them down like butterflies on a mat, like art at a museum. They were in spreadsheets, in notebooks, on scrap paper around my desk.
And while it might feel creative to think of these ideas, they were dying a lonely death when I wasn’t doing anything with them. They didn’t get their chance to add anything to the world. To affect someone. To spark something.
I lost out, too, with this arrangement. I didn’t push myself to think deeper and harder. I lost out on the feedback or insight or even criticism of others. I missed the chance to discover uncharted territory within myself. I stopped before I could start.
It wasn’t the best life I could give my ideas—or myself.
So I decided to change. To find a way forward, I cataloged all the things that had ever stopped me from creating so I could shoot them down, one-by-one. It turned out to be a helpful exercise, so I thought I’d share. 
Do any of these reasons for not creating something sound familiar to you?
Read More>

    fastcompany:

    I have a lot of ideas in my head. And for the most part, that’s where they used to stay.

    In my head. Where other people couldn’t see them, interact with them or build upon them. Where they were safe and untested and uncriticized. All mine.

    Sure, I’ve created some. Some might say I’ve created plenty. But that’s only because they can’t see what I’m not creating. For example, this very post sat dormant for at least a month while I pondered, waited and nitpicked at it.

    Because the riskiest, most dangerous and potentially most interesting ideas are the easiest to hold back. I would pin them down like butterflies on a mat, like art at a museum. They were in spreadsheets, in notebooks, on scrap paper around my desk.

    And while it might feel creative to think of these ideas, they were dying a lonely death when I wasn’t doing anything with them. They didn’t get their chance to add anything to the world. To affect someone. To spark something.

    I lost out, too, with this arrangement. I didn’t push myself to think deeper and harder. I lost out on the feedback or insight or even criticism of others. I missed the chance to discover uncharted territory within myself. I stopped before I could start.

    It wasn’t the best life I could give my ideas—or myself.

    So I decided to change. To find a way forward, I cataloged all the things that had ever stopped me from creating so I could shoot them down, one-by-one. It turned out to be a helpful exercise, so I thought I’d share.

    Do any of these reasons for not creating something sound familiar to you?

    Read More>

    — 1 week ago with 156 notes
    a poser of sorts

    thisadvertisinglife:

    What is the one “universal truth” within the advertising industry that resonates with you the most? Positively or negatively, doesn’t matter.

    You can never be right.

    — 2 weeks ago with 11 notes
    slaughterhouse90210:

“We are such inward secret creatures, that inwardness is the most amazing thing about us, even more amazing than our reason. But we cannot just walk into the cavern and look around. Most of what we think we know about our minds is pseudo-knowledge. We are all such shocking poseurs, so good at inflating the importance of what we think we value.—Iris Murdoch, The Sea, the Sea

    slaughterhouse90210:

    “We are such inward secret creatures, that inwardness is the most amazing thing about us, even more amazing than our reason. But we cannot just walk into the cavern and look around. Most of what we think we know about our minds is pseudo-knowledge. We are all such shocking poseurs, so good at inflating the importance of what we think we value.
    —Iris Murdoch, The Sea, the Sea

    — 3 weeks ago with 556 notes